Bonhoeffer uses a similar phrase 'worldly Christianity'. It's J Gresham Machen that I want to line up most closely with. See his Christianity and culture here. Having done commentaries on Proverbs (Heavenly Wisdom) and Song of Songs (Heavenly Love), a matching title for Ecclesiastes would be Heavenly Worldliness. For my stance on worldliness, see 3 posts here.

Dave Gorman Too much information

I was in a charity shop the other day and I saw a signed copy of Dave Gorman's Too much information (published 2014) which I picked up for very little. Gorman is somebody I am only vaguely aware of but this book, mostly about the Internet, was informative, fascinating, amusing and enjoyable to read. Gorman started as a comedian but has settled into this sort of analysis approach, which is full of mild humour but appears to have a higher motive. I was very interested in a piece near the end that gives some insight into how things are promoted on Google.

4 comments:

Paul Burgess said...

Another comedian turned serious writer/analyst is Dominic Frisby. I've read his Life After the State and Bitcoin.

Gary Brady said...

Don't know him. My son likes Stuart Lee, who can get quite serious at times. The usual way I think for comedians is to move into more serious territory (Lenny Henry and Jack Dee come to mind) eventually. I watched an old documentary on Spike Milligan recently. One wonders if a failure to get serious in a more open way only leads to problems in the end. Tony Hancock is perhaps another example.

Paul Burgess said...

Michael Palin another comedian turned serious.
I'd never heard of Frisby as a comedian. I came across the serious stuff first. His humour when I checked him out on YouTube was quite crude.

Gary Brady said...

Russell Brand is yet another (well, I think he's serious). Did you know that they often include a comedian on BBC TV's Question Time these days? (BTW it's Stewart Lee not Stuart, oops). Life makes you serious.